Pretend fossilisation (in Yorkshire)

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Pretend fossilisation (in Yorkshire)

Postby a_haworthroberts » Mon Aug 27, 2018 9:00 pm

https://creation.com/explain-caves
Tas Walker claims in comments: "There are many examples of rapid petrification from mineral rich waters, such as this one from the so-called Petrifying Well at Knaresborough, Yorkshire...
https://creation.com/the-amazing-stone- ... -yorkshire"

No. Despite the name 'Petrifying Well' it's not petrification in the sense in which that term is normally defined.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petrifying_well
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petrifaction
https://www.livescience.com/37781-how-d ... rocks.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mother_Shipton%27s_Cave
http://www.mothershipton.co.uk/educational/

And: http://www.fossilmuseum.net/fossilrecor ... eplacement
"Petrification
Petrification is a geology term denoting the processes by which organic material is converted into stone or a similar substance. It is approximately synonymous with fossilization. Petrified wood is the most well known result of this process. Petrification takes place in two related ways, replacement and permineralization, described below.
Replacement
Replacement takes place when water dissolves the original hard parts and replaces them with mineral matter. This chemical action may take place slowly, reproducing the microscopic structures of the original organism. Bone, shells and wood are often well preserved in this manner. The most common replacement minerals are calcite, silica, pyrite and hematite. The snails of the Green River Formation in Wyoming are often replaced by silica, a variation of quartz. The ammonites and goniatites of Europe and North Africa are commonly replaced by hematite, which is an iron mineral similar to, but more stable than pyrite. When the original hard parts are replaced quickly they often lose all trace of their original structure, leaving the original shape, but no detail. Agatized woods are often preserved in this manner, (agate is a form of quartz).
Permineralization
Permineralization takes place when ground water carrying dissolved minerals infiltrates the microscopic pores and cavities in bone, wood or shell. The minerals being deposited produce stony fossils that still contain a good deal of their original solid material. Bones, teeth and many marine organisms are preserved in this way. The fossil wood from the Petrified Forest of Arizona are a famous example of this type of preservation. The fossil teeth and bones of the Oligocene badlands of South Dakota and Nebraska are also common example of this type of fossilization, as well as the extensive deposits of Jurassic dinosaur bones in Utah and Colorado.
Pyritization is a Permineralization process involving sulfur and iron, and can result is formation of exquisite fossils and soft-tissue preservation. Organisms are pyritized when they are in marine sediments saturated with iron sulfides. Pyrite is iron sulfide (FeS2). As organic matter decays it releases sulfide which reacts with dissolved iron in the surrounding waters. Pyrite replaces carbonate shell material due to an undersaturation of carbonate in the surrounding waters. Some plants are also pyritized when they are in a clay terrain, but to a lesser extent than in a marine environment. Pyritized fossils are varied and particularly beautiful, such as this Jurassic Quenstedticeras ammonite and fossils from the Bundenbach Hunsruck Slate in Germany."
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Re: Pretend fossilisation (in Yorkshire)

Postby a_haworthroberts » Thu Aug 30, 2018 1:19 am

The above post was forwarded to CMI. And has been totally ignored. Not refuted. Just ignored.
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